Transcription Resume

The process of getting hired as a transcriptionist is a little different than what you may be used to.

When looking for a job as a transcriber, you’ll need to take a transcription test depending on the company you’re applying for, have the exam evaluated, and submit a resume for review. Your resume serves as a personal brochure that gives your prospective employer eyes into who you are. According to a study conducted by TheLadders, you have a mere 6 seconds to make a positive impression on an employer reviewing your resume, that’s it.

Your resume has to stand out in more ways than one to be shortlisted. In this post, you’ll learn how to tweak your resume so you’re getting the most you can out of those 6 seconds and land that dream job as a transcriptionist.

Most resumes include standard details like work experience, educational background, and skills. Here’s how to make them shine.

There are generally five sections in a resume:

  1. Your experience
  2. Your education
  3. Your skills
  4. Your profile summary
  5. Your profile picture (optional)

While it’s fine to change the order based on your strengths, each section should be well written and formatted with consistency.

Prove Your Skills by Being Specific

Every transcriptionist claims to be accurate and possesses good grammar and listening skills. How do employers know that you’re actually a skilled transcriber with 99% accuracy and flawless grammar?

Accuracy

Most resumes say “Can transcribe accurately” or “98% accuracy on transcripts.” Give details. Describe yourself as “99.5% accurate on easy audios and 98% on difficult audios.

See the difference? You’re backing up your statements with real numbers based on past experience, instead of hoping an occupied employer will take notice to your platitudes (Hint: they won’t).

Language Skills

Instead of saying “Good knowledge of grammar” try this:Proficient in grammar. Aware of parts of speech and the correct usage of punctuation in transcription.”

If you are multilingual don’t just write “fluent in English and Spanish.” Stress the fact that you actually know your language. “Fluent in English (US and UK). Very fluent in Spanish and familiar with all types of dialects and regional variations (Castilian, Española, Catalan and Galician, Columbian)”

Listening Skills

Don’t write “I have good listening skills” or “I am a good listener”. Address the need for those skills and take it a step further. “I have good listening skills. I can differentiate between speakers and can understand heavy accents.” Be specific.

Work Schedule

Here’s an actual example we saw in a resume: “I can work tight schedules and can deliver on time.” Improve on this by giving a reason as to how you can deliver. “Can handle tight turnaround schedules because I have a typing speed of 95 wpm with an accuracy of 99%.I thrive in high-pressure situations.”

Quality of Work

Good:I proofread my transcript and deliver the best quality.”

Better:My experience as an editor has trained me to proofread and deliver the best quality transcript I can.”

Typing Speed

typing speed

Having fast typing speed of 90+ words per minute (WPM)is not a required qualification for a career in transcription. If you don’t have a high typing speed, don’t worry about including it in your resume unless asked. However, we do recommend that you increase your speed to at least 75 WPM by taking typing classes that are freely available online. This will improve your efficiency so you can handle more projects in a specified period of time, effectively increasing your income.

Bottom line: Having good speed makes this profession more profitable for you and is a confidence booster, but it’s by no means required to get the job.

Have it? Flaunt it.

Your Experience

“I have 20+ years of experience as a transcriptionist.”

While 20 years shows commitment to your craft, it does not provide enough contextual information. Imagine competing with a person who has 10 years of experience but writes her experience as:

“I have worked as a transcriptionist in the legal, corporate and media fields for just over 10 years. My work profile includes hundreds of hours of transcripts for legal proceedings (including criminal and civil trials, bankruptcy, family law, insurance fraud, assessment hearings, depositions, pre-trials and more). I have transcribed interviews for corporations and scripts for television and film productions.”

See how the details make the candidate seem more qualified, despite having worked 10 years less than the aforementioned example? Always give a detailed profile of each assignment or place of work in a chronological order to give yourself an edge over your peers.

Your Education

education

If you’ve completed any kind of college education, be sure to mention it on your resume. It adds credibility to your profile. Since accuracy in transcription depends on a lot on general awareness, college degrees will give you an edge.

If you do not have any college degrees, mention any certifications, seminars, etc. that you have attained or attended, respectively. A certification aids in establishing a benchmark for your skill set so that employers will immediately know your baseline level, which may already be higher than other applicants. Likewise, attending seminars, webinars, etc. communicate a level of commitment to your transcription craft that employers find attractive not to mention you’ll be a better transcriber because of it.

This section is critical and is often times the most (or least!) impressive to an employer.

A general entry of your education qualifications could look like this:

  • Cornerstone University, Grand Rapids, MI August 1985 – May 1990
  • Degree in Secretarial Studies, (Calgary, Alberta, Canada 2008)
  • Certificate in Spanish/English Translation (University of Toronto, Canada, 2011)
  • B.A. in French, (Calgary, Alberta, Canada 2009)

An enhanced, polished entry would look like this:

  • Cornerstone University, Grand Rapids, MI August 1985 – May 1990
  • Degree in Secretarial Studies, (Calgary, Alberta, Canada 2008)
  • Certificate in Spanish/English Translation (University of Toronto, Canada, 2011)
  • B.A. in French, (Calgary, Alberta, Canada 2009)
  • Technical Writing Certificate (Humber College, Toronto, 2010)

My degrees and certifications demonstrate that I have multilingual skills and make me an ideal candidate to pursue transcription as a career.

Humanize Your Profile Summary

Try to weave your personality into your profile. It’s a tough thing to do on a professional resume, but most transcribers achieve it by mentioning their interests and how it made them a better person and transcriptionist.

Here’s an example of an average profile:

I type 80 wpm and have been transcribing from home for well over 12 years. I enjoy what I do and I am good at it. I live in Alabama but was raised in California. I have also spent 5 years in New York.

I have been married since 1992 and volunteer with an animal rescue group on the weekends, as well as being a foster mother for senior cats.

The above may have the human touch and contains a lot of information about the candidate but it doesn’t answer the biggest question: why should we hire you? Be sure to weave that into your profile.

Here’s an excellent example:

I type 80 wpm and have been transcribing from home for well over 12 years. I have 12 years of transcription experience, including acute care, clinic, ER, psychiatric, and surgery accounts. Over six years of this time was spent working as a speech recognition editor on the eScription platform. With this extensive experience and skill set, I feel I make a great candidate for a medical transcriptionist/speech recognition editor position with your company.

I enjoy what I do and I am good at it. I live in Alabama but was raised in California. I have also spent 5 years in New York.

I have been married since 1992 and volunteer with an animal rescue group on the weekends, as well as being a foster mother for senior cats.

Please review my resume and contact me for an interview and testing. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Which candidate would you hire? The difference is night and day!

Also Read: How to Market Your Candidacy to Earn High Profits as a General Transcriptionist

Should You Add a Picture?

It’s a hotly debated matter. In the US, a picture is not required on a resume. Employers are supposed to hire on qualifications, and it is assumed that a picture clouds their objectivity.

Many recruiters say that if LinkedIn requires a profile picture and it’s considered unprofessional not to have a picture, there should be pictures on a resume too. We leave the decision to you with a warning that some US companies may feel that you do not understand hiring protocol if you add a picture.

So go ahead and create your resume and send it over. All the best.

TCI logo

Transcription Certification Institute is committed to the community transcriptionists and translators. We have some excellent resources on our website. Our general transcription course that includes an internship for actual hands-on experience is highly rated by those who want to begin a career but do not know where to start.

If you are an experienced transcriber or translator looking for a job upload your resume on our job board to receive calls from employers.

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Summary
How to Nail the Transcriptionist Resume and Get Shortlisted
Article Name
How to Nail the Transcriptionist Resume and Get Shortlisted
Description
Want to start work from home general transcription job? Find out important points that need to be considered to market your candidacy through a well written professional resume for transcribers.
Author
Publisher Name
Transcription Certification Institute
Publisher Logo
Mahesh is the spokesperson of the Transcription Certification Institute, an Ellensburg, WA based company that provides comprehensive online general transcription training certification courses. This transcription certification course facilitates careers in transcription because it provides a guaranteed internship with a major transcription company upon certification.